TPS Stands for Temporary Protected Status

Salvadoran TPS recipients will lose protections

By Adryana Aldeen, Senior Correspondent

Texas Insider Report: AUSTIN, Texas — This week’s big news was that El Salvador Immigrants will lose their protections and nearly 200,000 are facing the September 9, 2019 deadline. The press release coming from Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said, amongst other things (see full release below,) the following:

WASHINGTON — Today, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced her determination that termination of the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for El Salvador was required pursuant to the Immigration and Nationality Act. To allow for an orderly transition, she has determined to delay the termination for 18 months. The designation will terminate on Sept. 9, 2019.

The decision to terminate TPS for El Salvador was made after a review of the disaster-related conditions upon which the country’s original designation was based and an assessment of whether those originating conditions continue to exist as required by statute. Based on careful consideration of available information, including recommendations received as part of an inter-agency consultation process, the Secretary determined that the original conditions caused by the 2001 earthquakes no longer exist. Thus, under the applicable statute, the current TPS designation must be terminated.

What is TPS, or Temporary Protected Status? The Secretary of Homeland Security may designate a foreign country for TPS due to conditions in the country that temporarily prevent the country’s nationals from returning safely, or in certain circumstances, where the country is unable to handle the return of its nationals adequately.

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) may grant TPS to eligible nationals of certain countries (or parts of countries), who are already in the United States. Eligible individuals without nationality who last resided in the designated country may also be granted TPS.

The fact of the matter is the word TEMPORARY, and that is what is it, a temporary statues. It is not a residence, it is not a permanent work visa, it is not citizenship. A little bit like the DACA program. Many of these recipients have applied to become residents of the United States and have been successful, on the other hand those who received should have understood temporary status means that: Temporary.

The issue here is that the Obama administration did not took care of the matter and in September of 2016 the Obama administration extended protections for 18 months, saying that El Salvador was still suffering lingering effects of the earthquake what killed over 1,000 people in 2001. However, there was a deadline and now they are setting another deadline. There will be families who will be greatly affected and that its understandable. But there are two extremes in this situation and both extremes have been heavily promoted by the wrong voices.

On one side we have House democrats like Leader Nancy Pelosi calling the situation a “heart breaking blow to nearly a quarter of million hard working Salvadorians who are American in every way” and like Rep. Bennie Thompson saying that the “it was the latest in a string of heartless, xenophobic actions from the Trump Administration”.This is not true and the Administration does not do this because they are heartless or xenophobic.

On the other side we heard speaking for conservatives groups who pretended being conservatives but who truly are xenophobic, environmentalist, progressive, pro-abortion, starting with the group that penetrated conservative circles with the help pf the late Phyllys Schaflly: NumbersUSA, a progressive, environmentalist group advocating immigration restrictions. Numbers USA called an “important step for the humanitarian programs credibility” and the fact is that many conservatives who listen to these groups :NumbersUSA, FAIR, etc. often get the wrong information (For more information on these xenophobic groups just read articles from current Breitbart writer Bob Price when he used to write for Texas GOP Vote )

The fact is in Texas we have more than 36,000 Salvadoran residents who were legally allowed to live and work in this country trough a temporary protected status My advice is that they approach their immigration attorneys immediately to try to find out so they can see what are their options to remain legally in the United States or otherwise prepare to return to their country. This is a country of rule of law and the laws must to be respected. . The following are the current situation with TPS programs giving to several countries.

El Salvador

  • After carefully considering information from a wide variety of sources, Secretary Nielsen has determined the termination of the TPS designation for El Salvador. She has determined to delay the termination for 18 months. The designation will terminate on Sept. 9, 2019.
  • The program started in 2001 and lasted for 17 years.

Haiti

  • TPS designation will be terminated on July 22, 2019.
  • Acting Secretary Duke determined that the extraordinary, but temporary conditions caused by the 2010 earthquake no longer exist.

Nicaragua

  • The decision to terminate TPS for Nicaragua was made after a review of the conditions upon which the country’s original 1999 designation were based and whether those substantial but temporary conditions prevented Nicaragua from adequately handling the return of their nationals, as required by statute.
    — No request has been made by the Nicaraguan government to extend current TPS status.
    — Secretary Duke determined that conditions caused in Nicaragua by Hurricane Mitch no longer exist, the current TPS designation must be terminated.
  • 12 month delay will:
    — Provide time for individuals with TPS to seek an alternative lawful immigration status in the United States, if eligible, or, if necessary, arrange for their departure.
    — Provide time for Nicaragua to prepare for the return and reintegration of their citizens.
    — TPS for Nicaragua will terminate on January 5, 2019.

Honduras

  • Secretary Duke concluded that additional time is necessary to obtain and assess supplemental information pertaining to conditions in Honduras in order to make TPS.
  • Therefore current TPS designation for Honduras has been automatically extended 6 months – through July 5, 2018.
  • However, it is possible that the TPS designation for Honduras will be terminated at the end of the six-month automatic extension with an appropriate delay.

Senior Correspondent Adryana Aldeen is frequently featured nationally, statewide and locally on Univision, Telemundo, CNN Español, FOX News, ABC, and other media outlets.

 

The press release coming from Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said the following:

WASHINGTON — Today, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced her determination that termination of the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for El Salvador was required pursuant to the Immigration and Nationality Act. To allow for an orderly transition, she has determined to delay the termination for 18 months. The designation will terminate on Sept. 9, 2019.

The decision to terminate TPS for El Salvador was made after a review of the disaster-related conditions upon which the country’s original designation was based and an assessment of whether those originating conditions continue to exist as required by statute. Based on careful consideration of available information, including recommendations received as part of an inter-agency consultation process, the Secretary determined that the original conditions caused by the 2001 earthquakes no longer exist. Thus, under the applicable statute, the current TPS designation must be terminated.

The Department of Homeland Security has conducted extensive outreach to Salvadoran communities throughout the country. This includes, but is not limited to, community forums on TPS, panel discussions with Salvadoran community organizers, stakeholder teleconferences, regular meetings with TPS beneficiaries, news releases to the Salvadoran community, meetings with Salvadoran government officials, meetings at local churches, and listening sessions. The Secretary met recently with the El Salvadorian Foreign Minister and Ambassador to the United States, and spoke with President Sánchez Cerén.

Following the 2001 earthquake, El Salvador received a significant amount of international aid to assist in its recovery efforts, including millions of dollars dedicated to emergency and long-term assistance. Many reconstruction projects have now been completed. Schools and hospitals damaged by the earthquakes have been reconstructed and repaired, homes have been rebuilt, and money has been provided for water and sanitation and to repair earthquake damaged roads and other infrastructure. The substantial disruption of living conditions caused by the earthquake no longer exist.

Additionally, in recent years, the U.S. government has been repatriating individuals back to El Salvador – more than 39,000 in the last two years – demonstrating that the temporary inability of El Salvador to adequately return their nationals after the earthquake has been addressed.

To allow for an orderly transition, the effective date of the termination of TPS for El Salvador will be delayed 18 months to provide time for individuals with TPS to arrange for their departure or to seek an alternative lawful immigration status in the United States, if eligible. Salvadorans in the United States who benefited from TPS may still receive other protections under our immigration system for which they are eligible.

The 18 months will also provide time for El Salvador to prepare for the return and reintegration of its citizens. During this timeframe, DHS will work with the Department of State and the Government of El Salvador to help educate relevant stakeholders and facilitate an orderly transition. In addition to materials posted online, DHS components will participate in outreach activities such as teleconferences, town halls and roundtables to ensure that affected populations have a full and accurate understanding of their rights and obligations.

Only Congress can legislate a permanent solution addressing the lack of an enduring lawful immigration status of those currently protected by TPS who have lived and worked in the United States for many years. The 18-month delayed termination will allow Congress time to craft a potential legislative solution.

Salvadorans with TPS will be required to re-register for TPS and apply for Employment Authorization Documents in order to legally work in the United States until the termination of El Salvador’s TPS designation becomes effective Sept. 9, 2019. Further details about this termination for TPS, including the re-registration period, will appear in a Federal Register notice. Salvadoran TPS beneficiaries should not submit re-registration applications until the re-registration period is announced through the Federal Register notice.


Source: Texas Politics

TPS Stands for Temporary Protected Status

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